Top subscribe filter_none issues my account search apps login google-plus facebook instagram twitter pinterest youtube lock

Rabbi Rami: My Morning Ritual

Practice

Before I share what I do regarding spiritual practice, let me share why I do it. I do it because I enjoy it. I don’t do it to get wise, enlightened, holy, or saved. I do it because I like doing it. In Judaism we call this lishmah, doing something for the intrinsic pleasure of just doing it. So now, what do I do.

Early each morning, often long before dawn, I chant. I chant in Hebrew and Sanskrit. I chant from the morning liturgy of my root tradition, Judaism, and I chant mantra from my adopted traditions, Buddhism and Hinduism. When it is light enough to walk, I leave my house and walk about four or five miles, most of it alone, some of it with my Goldendoodle guru, Murphy. I continue chanting while I walk, and within a mile or so I become aware of the Divine Mother, Chochmah/Sophia/Saraswati/Mary/Lady Wisdom walking with me, and we chat. I thank her for the gifts of yesterday, and share my concerns for today. She listens silently. And when she does speak she sounds like the Oracle from the first Matrix movie. Her message is always the same: stop thinking, stop clinging, stop fearing, I am with you.

When I return home, and after I have showered, I sit in silence and breathe. To help me settle I recite a mantra of sorts as I breathe: “Breathing in I welcome all sensation; breathing out I transcend all sensation. Breathing in I welcome all emotion; breathing out I transcend all emotion. Breathing in I welcome all thoughts; breathing out I transcend all thoughts. Breathing in I welcome all beings; breathing out I transcend all beings. Breathing in I welcome the One; breathing out I transcend the One.”

I do this for twenty to thirty minutes. Then I move to my desk and I study. I am at heart a Jnana yogi: my path is wisdom, and I find wisdom in silence but also in text. Ideas matter to me. They are seeds that can blossom into compassion and awareness, and I plant them in my mind through study and recitation. I do this throughout the day. Some of what I study ends up in books I write, so my spiritual practice becomes my financial support as well. I am blessed this way.


Rabbi Rami Shipiro

Author and teacher Rabbi Rami Shapiro will lead “Walking Without, Journeying Within”—a trip to the Holy Land with S&H in fall 2018.

Rabbi Rami Shapiro is an award-winning author, essayist, poet, and teacher. His spiritual advice column, "Roadside Assistance for the Spiritual Traveler," addresses reader questions pertaining to religion, spirituality, faith, family, God, social issues, and more.

His newest book is The World Wisdom Bible.

He has this to say about religion: "To me, religions are like languages: no language is true or false; all languages are of human origin; each language reflects and shapes the mindset of the civilization that speaks it; there are things you can say in one language that you cannot say or cannot say as well in another; and the more languages you know, the more nuanced your understanding of life. Judaism is my mother tongue, yet in matters of the spirit I strive to be multi-lingual. In the end, however, the deepest language of the soul is silence."

To comment on this installment of One For the Road or submit a question, email the editors. Questions may be edited for length and clarity; all are published anonymously.

Learn from Rabbi Rami!

Register now for Rabbi Rami's new online course, The Sacred Art of Forgiveness


This entry is tagged with:
Morning RitualsChanting

Enlightening, Empowering, Innovative, Inspiring… Don’t Miss a Word!

Become a subscriber, or find us at your local bookstore, newsstand, or grocer.

Find us on instagram @SpiritHealthMag

Instagram @SpiritHealthMag


1 (844) 375-3755
2018 Spirituality & Health MEDIA, LLC

SAVE 20% OFF

ALL S&H COURSES

Now through Dec. 31st.

That's $72 per course or one year of All-Access for only $180.

Use code: COURSES20