Spirituality & Health Magazine

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Spring Secrets Vegetable Chili

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Dietary Considerations: 
Vegetarian
Vegan
Meal: 
Lunch
Dinner

This chili is packed with many of my favorite spring secrets. The first is a small green daikon radish that has a slightly sweeter taste than the larger and more pungent white variety commonly sold in Asian markets. The watermelon radish looks just like a tiny watermelon when sliced, with a light green skin and a bright fuchsia-colored center; it also has a milder taste, similar to a white radish, that is not as sharp as a red radish. Burdock root is a bitter and pungent vegetable often used in cleansing teas. It is a long, straight, and sturdy brown root that has a carrot-like appearance and a white ringed center. Combined with the bright rainbow-colored stems of the leafy chard and the purple cauliflower, this dish is as beautiful as it is nutritious.

Y I E L D • S I X TO EIGHT 1- C U P (1 6 6 –125 G) SERVINGS (DEPENDING ON COOKING TIME AND REMAINING LIQUID)

  • 1 cup (250 g) black beans, soaked overnight
  • 1 cup (170 g) pinto beans, soaked overnight
  • 11⁄2 quarts (1.5 L) water
  • 1 piece kombu seaweed
  • 1⁄4 cup (30 g) chopped daikon or white radish
  • 1⁄2 cup (30 g) chopped watermelon radish or rutabaga
  • 1 cup (100 g) purple or white cauliflower
  • 1⁄4 cup (35 g) chopped burdock root or turnips
  • 1 cup (67 g) chopped dandelion greens or rainbow chard
  • 1⁄2 cup (80 g) chopped red onion
  • 1⁄2 cup (75 g) chopped green bell pepper
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 jalapeño or hot pepper, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon (2.6 g) chili powder
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon (1.3 g) ground paprika
  • 1⁄2 cup (30 g) chopped parsley, thyme, green onions, or a mixture of all three
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) apple cider vinegar
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon salt

Soak the black and pinto beans in water overnight, then drain and combine with water and kombu. Cook on medium heat until boiling, then reduce heat to medium low and cover. Cook for 2 hours, stirring occasionally. Remove the kombu from the pot and add all remaining ingredients except salt. Continue cooking for another 25–30 minutes and add the salt in the last few minutes of cooking. The beans should be tender without any crunchiness, but the vegetables should retain their form and have a slight firmness. Beans vary in firmness based on their age and storage, so the amount of time necessary to make them tender always varies. If the beans are not done at this point, add another 1⁄2 to 1-cup (120–235 ml) water and continue cooking for another 15 minutes.

From A Simple, Healing Cleanse by Kimberly Larson, © Quarto Publishing Group. Used by permission from the publisher, Fair Winds Press, an imprint of Quarto Publishing Group. QuartoKnows.com